Political Discourse in the Workplace: Embrace the Authenticity

Leaders should avoid influencing voting behavior of employees

We live in strange, and some would say scary, times.  Political rhetoric, commonplace in Presidential campaign years, has been far more polarizing that usual.  And the vitriol between major party candidates has egged on and perhaps revealed diametric beliefs and prejudices in our society.  As a former political science major in college, with follow-up graduate study in public administration, public policy, and eventually organizational psychology, I don’t shy away from the debate, in person or on social media.  And many can attest to my penchant for acting as provocateur in many of these forums.  I enjoy pushing the boundaries and questioning beliefs…I’ll admit it.

But people do take offense, and sometimes that’s okay, I’d argue.  And I’ve written in the past that when one sees articles, memes, or just plain bizarre (in our opinions) pictures posted on social media, we always have a choice to respond, either with comments or by simply removing that person from our feed or contacts.  It’s a fairly easy solution.

pulitzerfacepalm-e1334711507124And, as I’ve said, the passion that accompanies (in increasing fashion) various “debates” on social media sites is ramping up in direct relation to the temporal proximity of election day.  Even that’s quickly spread from its haunts on Facebook and Twitter to infect more professional sites like LinkedIn.  Again, there’s an easy fix, if we find ourselves offended by political diatribes.

Earlier today, I read an interesting (if somewhat simplistic) article about how the current political battlefield is creating discomfort within the locker rooms of the National Football League.  In and of itself, this should surprise no one, particularly in light of the protests certain high-profile players have enacted in recent months.  Tension and ill will are creeping into environments that have long been paragons of communal bonds, causing some to question the motives, thoughts, and ingrained beliefs of their coworkers.

a_101_nflprotests_160912

And I’ve asked people in a variety of industries and work environments if they’re seeing the same things playing out in their organizations.  The responses have been predictable, if not troubling:

  • “I’m sure they are, but we don’t talk about things like that here.”
  • “Yeah, it’s tough to know you’re working with people who could believe that way, so we don’t address it.”
  • “Better to keep one’s personal beliefs to oneself, I always say.”
  • “Politics and religion are out-of-bounds at our company.”

Is anyone surprised by these statements?  This is the way we’ve been trained, similar to those family gatherings or early morning lumberjack breakfasts, where silence was the only way to avoid confrontation and potential brawls!

But is it healthy?  Is it ultimately productive, or strategically oriented to the long-term sustainability of one’s workforce?  I would argue it is neither of these…Ignoring the deep-seated beliefs of one’s workers, coworkers, bosses, or even customers does not breed healthy environments.  It does not promote effective teamwork or effective productivity.  And it does not make one a function, viable organization (in either a family or work setting) for long!

TrustRelationships are all about trust.  And where we ignore the diversity of thought that exists between ourselves and others around us, we don’t nurture an atmosphere of trust, but rather of fear and uncertainty.  When we aren’t enabled to respectfully disagree with those with whom we are sharing a life (personally or professionally), or even worse, we don’t even acknowledge that we disagree on fundamental beliefs and values, we aren’t developing stronger relationships, we’re merely hollowing out relationships built on smoke and mirrors.

When we talk about organizational effectiveness and employee engagement, a natural link is made to the “right fit.” And we know that when individuals feel more closely aligned with the values of the organization and their coworkers, their engagement numbers soar.  And yet, when we stifle honest, respectful exchanges around closely held belief systems, we’re setting our organizations and our employees up for a fall.  At some point, someone will figure out that how we’re acting or the beliefs they believe we espouse are not, in fact, the true “us.”  At that point, more than likely, the damage is irreparable.  When people realize their presumed understanding of others’ beliefs was based on falsities, it’s tough to get past the sense of betrayal.

So, wouldn’t we all be better off openly and honestly discussing with our work teams our beliefs on politics, religion, and anything else that speaks to someone’s individual values?  If we preach “goodness of fit,” shouldn’t we look at how our own personal values truly do match with those of our organization or our team?

images (15)The key is in practicing (and teaching) respect for alternative perspectives.  You may hold strong beliefs in a particular political candidate with whom I strongly disagree.  You might have religious preferences that I don’t share.  Heck, you might believe in raising your kids with completely different ideas around discipline, tv watching, or myriad other issues that conflict with my own choices.  But none of those may mean we can’t work together….or conversely, perhaps they all mean we shouldn’t work together!  But that’s an individual choice that can only be made if we actually share our perspectives, beliefs, and values with those with whom we work.

That’s the point here.  Just as we probably wouldn’t date someone for long without wanting to know their beliefs on religion, politics, or simply treating others, why do we accept those areas as “off limits” in many professional settings?  Why do we object so fervently to posts on LinkedIn (or any social media) that reveal the true nature of those with whom we’re connected?

So, next time you find yourself objecting to content others post, view it as an opportunity to contemplate whether the values such content espouses (and that your contact clearly supports) reflect the type of values you want in personal or professional relationships.  If the value of the relationship outweighs the moral conundrum, then stick with it and accept what they’ve posted.  If the ethical or moral elements are too onerous, then terminate the relationship.

Remember, it’s not the quantity of contacts or “friends” you have that matters.  What counts is the quality of the relationships and the people with whom you surround yourself.  It really doesn’t have to be harder than that!

 People Puzzle

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